Posted in #teamhadley, 2017, 2018, Beating Hemiplegic Migraine, best friends, Botox, celebrate, Celebrate gif, Chevrolet Trax, Chevy Trax, Chronic Migraine, Daily Migraine, Dr. Cheesy, Dr. Lucchese, Dystonia, family, Friends gif, Health Blog, Hemiplegic Migraine, Hemiplegic Migraine Research Study, HM, invisibile illness teacher, Invisible Illness, Just Keep Keepin On, MU Health Care, port, portacath, preschool teacher, Rare Disease, Rare Disease Awareness, Rare Disease Awareness Day, Rare Disease Awareness Day 2017, Rare Disease Awareness Day 2018, Seizures, SHM, Sporadic Hemiplegic Migraine, support, thankful, Today I Win, Uncategorized, University ER, University of Missouri Health Care, Winning 365 Days, writer's block

Winning 365 Days

Hi, friends! I can’t believe it’s been close to a year since I’ve published a blog. I’ve worked on many but never got the right words across. I think I needed a break from talking about my sick life so much. I’m grateful I still have people reach out to me and that I continue to virtually meet and connect with more fighters. I hope this post still reaches people. I also hope it gives some others with invisible illnesses some hope. 🙂

February 2018 is over now. Who can believe that we’re already moving onto March? I’m glad for this month to be behind us, and have been ready for it be to for awhile. And not because mushy gushy Valentines day annoys me. 😉 February 28th, 2018 marks one year since I have been in the emergency room. Did you hear that people? ONE YEAR. For the last five years I never believed that would happen. Now, everybody pray I didn’t just jinx myself. I won’t be able to fully put into words the amount of thanks and weight off of my shoulders this brings, but I’m going to try to get as close as I can.

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Since 2012 I’ve been fighting a battle bigger than I ever could’ve imagined I would be up against. Hemiplegic Migraines and Chronic Daily Migraines stole five years of my life, nearly completely. I’m in the 0.02% of the population struggling with the ridiculous number of symptoms that come with this disease. It’s like a pinball machine of symptoms; each one triggering another up and down my right side. And even though it’s been five years, I still don’t like saying “I have a disease” in a sentence.

For those of you that don’t know, October 26, 2012 I was sitting in my sophomore Spanish class when I fell and had a seizure for the first time. Starting when I was 16 it looked like I was having a stroke more often then I looked like a “normal” teenager. Two years and 11 doctors later I was diagnosed with Sporadic Hemiplegic Migraines(SHM). I still wish the name didn’t end in migraine and maybe it would be taken a tad more seriously from those that don’t know anything about it. If you’re interested in some facts check out this link. (Diamond is where I was diagnosed) —> https://www.diamondheadache.com/patient-resources/types-and-symptoms/hemiplegic-migraine/

Here’s the best part, this year I’ve actually been “doing life” more than ever! Who gets so excited about adulting? Instead of weekly emergency room trips (seriously weekly), I’m working, driving, living. I work at a preschool which is something I have wanted to do, until starting my career, since I was in elementary school. Last week one of my sweet preschoolers asked what job I wanted to have when I get big. I hope, and plan, to become a nurse instead of a broadcast journalist like I planned for seven years. I would love to work in an infusion center, or specialized migraine clinic someday. She then told me when she gets big, she wants to be Ms. Hadley. ❤  That sure pulls on my heart strings. I love those kiddos.

I bought my own car and I’ve never been so happy to spend all my money. Hello more freedom as a 21 year old!! I’ve socialized more in the last six months than I have in the previous five years (I’m still pretty lame). My next step, aside from some time graduating from college, is to move out of my parents house before I’m a loser. Even though for now, that’s still the best choice for me.


​All of this being said, life still isn’t the easiest. While I don’t visit the emergency room weekly, I still go to the hospital every week. IV meds have always proven to help me the most so instead of getting them as a rescue in the ER, I get them as a preventative. Every Monday I go to the Ellis Fischel Cancer Center Ambulatory Infusion Unit for a six hour infusion, followed by an appointment to my neurologist, chiropractor and pharmacy. That probably sounds dramatic to most people, but I couldn’t be more appreciative of it because the routine has truly saved my life. I hated having to be a frequent flyer in the emergency room, being the main source of treatment obviously isn’t what that’s intended for. But it was what I was forced to do while I was doctor-less (or under the care of a useless neuro) for too long. Just because I haven’t been in the ER for a year doesn’t mean I haven’t been hospitalized this year. My attacks and damn jaw still occasionally decide to go hay wire, getting me admitted to the hospital. That’s just a detail I’ll have to accept likely for the rest of my life. I won’t even put out there the amount of medication it takes to keep me going since medication use can sometimes be so controversial these days. But I will say, while I don’t love having to use so many, after you lose so much of your life, you’re incredibly thankful for modern day medicine. I also use migraine and dystonia botox, weekly chiropractor visits and semi-frequent massages to get relief. Even with all of these drastic measures I’m still in daily pain more than you would ever know. That’s both the pro and con of an invisible disease. But how many times have I reiterated that I’m grateful for the progress that I’ve made?

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Infusion Day!

Lastly, and probably most importantly, the power of prayer and God is so incredible. While I always had faith, I often found myself questioning God’s reasoning for me having this wreck my life. I still don’t, and probably never will, understand that reasoning, but I trust in it now. For, when life gets too hard to stand, kneel. I’m confident that every prayer my way, which I know is an unbelievable number, made a difference. I truly believe my greatest blessings in life are my family, support systems, and Dr. Cheesy. Dr. Cheesy saved my life. That man has believed in me, fought for me and dedicated so much time to me since my first appointment with him. He kept his promise he made me on that April Fools day initial appointment. Any other time I would’ve thought it was an April Fools prank, but with him I knew in my soul it was not. Dr. Cheesy has seen me every Monday for the last (almost) two years. He has studied me. He continues to test me, always looking for more answers, more ways to help. He’s texted me back past midnight with attack plans when a bad HM attack hits, and fought back with the hospital when they’ve tried to push against him. That man has gone to multiple conferences in many states specifically for my  case, had special meetings for help with me, and presented my case in seminars to reach more doctors. Doctors like him are one in a million. Dr. Cheesy promised to give me my quality of life back if I gave him some time. That’s exactly what he has done.

The last 365 days have been some of the best of my life. I have never won so much. Support and family are priceless. Dr. Cheesy is an answered prayer. God is so so good. 2017, I love you. Today, I win.

 

 

 

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Posted in #teamhadley, Beating Hemiplegic Migraine, Chronic Migraine, Daily Migraine, Dystonia, Health Blog, Hemiplegic Migraine, Hemiplegic Migraine Research Study, HM, Just Keep Keepin On, MU Health Care, port, Seizures, SHM, Sporadic Hemiplegic Migraine, Today I Win, Uncategorized, University of Missouri Health Care, writer's block

nine.twenty-eight. twenty-sixteen.

Friends! I’ve missed you all! I’ve been absent for three months and some change, at this point. That’s practically years in blogging time. I feel terribly about it. Now, that doesn’t mean it has been months, or even weeks, since I last worked on a post. For me, and others passionate about writing, I cannot publicly publish a piece that I’m not happy with. It’s the very same as an artist being unwilling to turn in an incomplete piece of work. When writing there isn’t some formula you can follow that creates a “correct” post in the end, no one else can help make the words flow just right. Writing is a creative process and again, like artists, sometimes a wall gets built up that keeps your creativity from flowing. Writing is also an emotional process. No matter if you’re writing something fictional and having to give a person built only with words an entire personality, or if you’re writing something very real that is putting raw depictions out for all to read. Behind each piece, within each piece, lies so much emotion.

So, this is where I stand; I sit down at my computer at least once a week adding to, or creating a completely new piece, I don’t like how it comes together or feel as if anyone reading it could feel that my heart isn’t in it, I collect ideas that others give me and try so hard to write something within the realm of their brainstorm, I send pieces to my closest friends or other bloggers asking their opinions, I set a deadline for myself, I get frustrated, slam my computer shut, miss the deadline, and feel even more frustrated. I’ve come to realize the amount of pressure I feel to get a post out every so often. But why? No one has ever pressured me to write these blogs, no one has given me negative input. I’ve never felt this pressure before, because the source of this tension is me.

At first I was okay with taking a mini break, I knew my mind needed it. It can be so hard to talk about the bad days and the ugly details. When I share those with you guys it means I have to, kind of, go through them again. Though I may not be physically going through each attack or situation again, emotionally I have to in order to share the truth. That in turn means I feel the mental exhaustion all over again, on top of the current, steady, mental and physical exhaustion I always carry. Again, no one asked me to do this to myself. No one asked me to continuously share my life so vividly through this outlet. I do it, and will continue to do so, because I love the support, interest, knowledge and relationships that have sparked from this platform I have created. The time put into this site wouldn’t be worth much if I didn’t keep it real, raw, and unedited.

My mini break has somehow turned into a very extended break. But to be honest, I feel refreshed. Forcing myself to write because I need to, not because I want to isn’t real, raw or honest. Through all of this time I have continued to have conversation with those who reach out and even speak with/participate in a research study being done for Hemiplegic Migraines!! This is a huge step. In the three months off I’ve made good friends with a fellow spoonie. Though she lives countries away from me, we chat almost daily. This is why I blog.

While all above is true, I’m also very excited to share many of my good days and positive changes that I’ve made strides towards recently! Thank you for being understanding and supportive. This officially means I AM BACK! Now you guys can hold me to it 😉

I’ve missed you all!

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Posted in #teamhadley, Beating Hemiplegic Migraine, Botox, Chronic Migraine, Daily Migraine, Dystonia, Health Blog, Hemiplegic Migraine, Lidocaine Infusion, Lidocaine Infusion for Migraine, MU Health Care, PCU, port, portacath, Seizures, Today I Win, Uncategorized, University ER, University of Missouri Health Care

FOUR WEEKS

On Friday, May 6th, I got released from a 13 day hospital stay and headed home. Home was where I needed to be. Graham was stoked to have me back, he talked non stop to me as soon as we picked him up from the Bequette’s house and made sure to carry everything inside so I didn’t have to. I was still so heavily medicated my mom just wanted to get some food in me before I went to bed, sweet G talked to me the whole time we ate, even though every minute or so he’d have to ask if I was okay because my head would bob forward into my bowl. Trying to act like I’m okay and it being physically impossible for me to fake it just for him, at a time like that, is solely one of the hardest parts in dealing with this nasty disease. BUT I WAS HOME.

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For the weekend my brothers and pup were all actually so glad I was easily found in my room, they all kept just coming in because they liked that I was in there, and I liked that too. I got to spend the day at my grandparents’ house, like a typical weekend, and get knee deep in the pond with Jax. Kelsey and I resumed our typical Grey’s Anatomy watch party positions on my couch and I got to sleep in MY OWN BED! I was in high Heaven. I’m always complaining about being home too much, then I don’t get to come home for a few days, now I don’t want to leave it! Back to normal felt so good.

On Monday afternoon, the 10th, I went to my check in appointment with my Neurologist where we were supposed to make a game plan. I was pretty aware that we’d be scheduling lidocaine infusions but I wasn’t sure what the details attached would be, such as a scheduling date. Lidocaine Infusions for migraine is a fairly new treatment idea catching on in the world of migraine. These treatments are something I had been researching since August of 2015. I had asked a couple of other doctors about them, one saying he didn’t know and one saying I should give it a shot but that no one around here did anything like it. I had an appointment to travel to a specialized clinic in Texas this winter, but the doctor fell very ill days before I was supposed to see him and he is no longer practicing. I was in communications with a doctor in Washington D.C. that I was referred to that did Lidocaine Infusions for migraine, until I first met with Dr. Cheesy who suggested trying those before I even got the chance to ask about them.

Dr. Cheesy told me I would be hospitalized for 5-7 days in the ICU, the ICU being just a precaution as it is still a relatively new idea and Lidocaine is a serious drug that can seriously affect your heart. After discussing the idea a bit more at my appointment that Monday, Dr. Cheesy asked me when I would like to try them. I sarcastically said, “I’d start tomorrow” and literally laughed. He said, “Okay, can you be here by 11 am? I was going to have you come in tonight but I figure you want to go home and get your stuff together.” I seriously had to ask him if he was joking, most doctors take months to schedule the smallest of things.

He was serious. Tuesday, May 11th, I checked back into the hospital. At first, I wasn’t too bothered that I was having to come back in. I was glad that my new doctor was continuing to prove to be a “do-er”  and try new things. I was glad to be trying something that I had put so much research and back hours into, and interested in trying something new that had the potential to completely cut back all things hospital to a reasonable amount. I knew I needed to try it. Dr. Cheesy told me he didn’t expect to see drastic results with me until around day 5, because I’m complicated.

What I didn’t think about, however, was that I had just been sent home with several extra things to help control the pain and movement issue of the jaw on top of having my regular HM rescue medications that I try. Because the Lidocaine was a new treatment for me, I could only take my daily medications that couldn’t be skipped. Rescue medications I know work to help abort an attack, like Benadryl, were avoided in order to be able to differentiate the difference between the lidocaine making a difference or not. Unfortunately, because of this, the timing just so happened that an attack hit right on day two of me trying the new infusions. Since rescues weren’t an option, by Friday I was in full attack mode and the jaw locked open.

Without a doubt that was the most painful time my jaw has ever been locked open. It had just so recently been reset that my jaw wasn’t even supposed to be opened that far. As soon as it happened I started bawling and then looked at my grandma and said, “I’m not supposed to open my mouth all the way for three months. It’s not supposed to do this!” As soon as it happened, Kelsey, my best friend, jumped up to call the nurse, then sat in my bed with me for hours. After getting X-rays we knew my jaw was dislocated again, but it was Friday night by the time we knew it would have to be reset so I had to wait, again, until the next day. I had to be taken off of the Lidocaine before I could have the sedation medication used in order to comfortably have my jaw reset, anyways, so that night Friday we stopped the Lidocaine starting the wait. My doctor ordered that I have a NG feeding tube placed again, for the first time in the trip I was trying to keep the tears in and I was having a tough time staying positive. Just days before I had gotten my previous NG tube out and had said I wasn’t ever going to get another one again, but here I was less than a week later, hoping that the metal weight was correctly placed in my stomach. While my Dad left the room for bit I had a heart to heart with my nurse who let me cry it out, then  got me back to my conquering attitude and placed the tube.

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The next few days went okay, I wish they would’ve been better. I got to resume the lidocaine after 48 hours of being removed from it but I wasn’t allowed to have my drip increased for several days, originally the plan was to have it increased daily, putting me at a high dose by the end. Lidocaine can seriously affect your heart so every six hours I had to get an EKG, thankfully those continued to come back within normal range. Because I was stuck at a lower dose than expected and my heart was handling the medication well, I did not have to stay in the ICU like planned. I spent the whole ten day trip on the PCU unit, which is where I spent a majority of the week before so I was thankful for familiar faces. 

On Monday, while still receiving Lidocaine, I was scheduled for to get Botox in my jaw. However, this required that my jaw be fully opened again, which of course dislocated it immediately seeing as it had only been two days since the ENT team had reset it Saturday. All of my doctors were expecting it to lock open but felt that the Botox was worth the shot, so the ENTs were waiting for me upstairs, after hours, to reset my jaw by the time I made it back to my room. Thankfully, this time I got to continue on the Lidocaine drip even with the Versed and Fentanyl, because my neurologist had already decided not to increase the Lidocaine dose any further.

The last four days of my stay I was quite miserable. I was placed on an “NPO” diet, meaning that I couldn’t eat or drink anything except for water. That didn’t really bother me because I couldn’t eat if I wanted to, my jaw was extremely painful, swollen, and continuing to spasm. My doctor explained my jaw situation to me in this way; “What happens when someone tears their ACL? They immobilize it, have surgery, and continue to keep it immobilized with no weight for several months. That’s what happened to your jaw. Except you just “tore your ACL” or dislocated your jaw three times in two weeks, and “had ACL surgery” or got your jaw reset three times in two weeks. The only difference being that your jaw isn’t immobilized.” After the first reset of my jaw I was told to expect a three month recovery, three months before I could eat normally again or not have pain and movement issues. Three months is now nine months. I was thankful for the ACL comparison because that made me feel less like a baby, and it also gave me a good way to explain the ordeal to others in a way they may better understand.

The best part of hospital stays is having visitors. This time I actually remembered most of them, even better! My sweet best friend came and spent several hours every. single. day. She sat in bed with me and didn’t say a word when I needed to cry because I hurt, she kept my ming off things playing UNO and Hangman for hours, she communicated for me when I couldn’t do so for myself and she stayed the night with me when she knew my parents needed a little break. I wouldn’t be doing as well as I am today if she weren’t around this time. My other friend came on several of her lunch breaks, friends surprised me and some came after work. The social support continues to blow my mind. I’m so so thankful.

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I got to go leave the hospital on May 20th, ten days after being admitted. I left with my head pain at a level 7 out 10. The Lidocaine had kept my headache level at a seven for about three days in a row, this was something my family, Dr. Cheesy and I celebrated! We all knew this was a big step for me. Unfortunately to consider the Lidocaine infusions successful,  I would’ve had to walk out of the hospital with a level 1 or lower headache. I was super bummed that didn’t happen and I’m having to cross of yet another treatment. But I got to try it! So at least now I know! I’m very fortunate to have access to these treatments and very thankful for this amazing new doctor. Until Dr. Cheesy can say that I am “stable”, he is having weekly appointments with me. WEEKLY. It’s amazing. Every week we get to talk things over with him, switch any medications around that we may need to, and discuss the next plan of action. Though I have been super bummed that I haven’t been doing great, I have been living off of IM shots and other rescues, I now even have to wear a pain patch, I haven’t been in the hospital for ONE MONTH. I couldn’t be more excited about that!!!! I’m still on a mostly liquid diet. I think I’ve tried a baked potato from every single restaurant around. lol and I have to carefully plan my days and my shots. But Dr. Cheesy has kept me out of the hospital for FOUR WEEKS, and that is four weeks longer than any other doctor has been able to do for a year now!!!!

This is such a long post that continues to ramble on and on but I needed to get this way overdue update posted!

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Posted in Beating Hemiplegic Migraine, Chronic Migraine, Daily Migraine, Health Blog, Hemiplegic Migraine, Just Keep Keepin On, Seizures, Today I Win, Uncategorized, Vlog

Rare Disease Awareness Day 2016🤒🤕😷

Each year, the last day of February represents the only day of the year rare diseases are recognized.  With nearly 20 million Americans living with a rare disease, you probably know someone fighting one of these battles, yet their day won’t get half the recognition that national Margarita Day or Pet Day gets. Each of us unfortunate enough to know the importance of this day would much rather celebrate Kiss and Make-Up Day, August 25th, or National Chocolate Covered Anything Day, December 16th. It’s still awkward for me to claim importance to a title with the words “Rare” and “Disease”, but it’s important so I’m going for it.

That being said, of the close to 7,000 rare diseases listed, I could have it so much worse. My life isn’t on the line and just glancing at me, most days, you can’t tell I’m sick. The invisible part of this illness is both a blessing and a curse. I’m still trying to find a way to bring positive attention, conversation and knowledge to the topic without it having to bring so much sick spotlight attention back on me, does that make any sense? Lol. Being sick has affected me in every way possible. I can find both positives and negatives, it’s proven to be productive and counterproductive all at once, while simultaneously dragging me down the roughest years of my life that I’ve somehow also turned into the years I learned most about myself. It’s most definitely a unique experience, but I don’t think I could go as far as to say that I wouldn’t trade it for the world.

So, as I was brainstorming ideas for how to recognize February 29th this year, I googled Rare Disease Awareness Day 2016. The theme, if you will, just so happens to be about including all the people a disease affects, not just the person who is sick. Perfect! I immediately had an idea for a video and started scouting people out for help. I came up with five questions and asked some of my people to awkwardly let me record them answering them. Since they all rock, I got both my brothers, my mom, two best friends, and a family friend all talked into participating in the video. Score! I told everyone to be as un-rehearsed as possible and I was really looking forward to hearing all the different interpretations of each question.

They haven’t seen it yet, so ready or not, go watch!

 

Hey medical community, did ya catch our drift? 😉🙄

Posted in Beating Hemiplegic Migraine, Hemiplegic Migraine

Anniversary or Un-iversary?

Three years. 36 months. One thousand, ninety five days. Three grades. The cliche “time feels like it has flown by and not moved at at once” has never rung so true. October 26, 2012 I had my first seizure and never looked back. Since that first day in Spanish class, I can count on my fingers the number of seizure or attack free days that I have had. In so many ways I can’t convince myself it’s possible that this all started three short years ago, on the other hand I cannot believe I just used the term, “three short years ago”. It’s really odd to think back on that day, no memory of mine is so pristine. Waking up that Friday morning I felt awful but attributed that to having cheered in the rainy district game the night before, eating/sleeping poorly, and a fall allergy asthma attack. When Sean greeted me that morning, he said “Whoa, not feeling too hot?” Third hour I let him know I had passed out, he texted back “Atta girl!” These are perfect examples as to life before seizures. Before seizures became the norm, telling someone I passed out carried the assumption I just fell asleep at a bad time, commenting on the unexpected meant me looking like I got it by a truck, now the unexpected is me not looking like a character from The Walking Dead. My first trip into the ER, ever, came that Sunday after a second episode. The ER doctor didn’t run a single blood test or scan, instead he came in and racked it up to constipation. The guy literally squeezed as if he were extremely constipated and my dad literally laughed like this guy was an actual doctor. Funny enough he is now an ER doctor that I would prefer over some.

That whole first week I was so sick my everything was exhausted and I had pain deep in my bones. Many people suggested I get tested for mono, that never happened but I now wish we would’ve pushed harder for that. There are some recent understandings that a mutated strand of Mono can cause Sporadic Hemiplegic Migraine. That being said, when we consider the week before, at my aunt’s wedding, everyone asked if I was sick, at the time I didn’t think I was but six days later…    just something more to ponder😉

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A lot has changed in the last year, I would say more than before but I’m pretty sure I said that last year. lol. We’ve learned just how hard it is to live with a progressive disease. A significant dip in my cognitive function has been clear the past few months, at least in the memory department. I used to be able to recall the tiniest details for years, now I ask the same question over and over without noticing I’ve already gotten the answer. It’s so uncomfortable when I’m mid conversation with someone, like a nurse, and out of the blue I truly cannot recall a signal detail of the conversation, what I was going to say or what had just come out of my mouth. Days that happens I typically end up remembering zero of. But positively, I think I’ve grown most in my attitude. My understanding, learning, and mood have all changed significantly this year and I’m glad to say I’m confident that I have grown in that department.

Needless to say, when this all started we had no idea that we’d be wishing for 30 second pass-outs in the future. Three years ago, doctors told me I was dehydrated and stressed. Three years ago, my psych consult listened to all of my baggage and ultimately encouraged me to go back to the medical side of things. Two years ago, doctors labeled me just another teen girl with a conversion disorder and swore in 6-12months, psych would have me healed. Two years ago, well that psych consult was bad on my end. 😯But, she saw through my frustration and still told us to go back to the medical side. One year ago, doctors comforted me and promised to know “Hadley”, not just be another doctor unable to pick me out of a line up. One year ago, the psych PA ditched the consult out of shock that doctors had played hot potato with me like that, while the Dr applauded my ability to self advocate and be so knowledgable. I now wish my previous physicians would’ve bet their medical licenses on me being magically healed way back when.

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This is another video contest prompt; “Show us your fight with HM this year” I think it was the perfect thing to get together, a video is the only way to truly show my special support over the year. Going through the pictures and videos made me a tad emotional, of course. I often am disappointed in myself for not being able to solve my own problems. Then again, I’m impressed that I get up and do life on some of the days I do. I never knew a blog would require me to take so many more selfies😂 That being said, the selfies themselves were a reminder that I’m not fighting for my life and to be thankful I’m able to get available treatments. There’s always someone out there who has it worse than you. 👇🏼

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oj8d1FPT7kw

My editing skills are still in the learning process. Winners of this contest get rewarded medical bill scholarships.

So thank YOU, for reading this blog, for taking the time to send an encouraging comment, for going out of your way to come chat with me, for checking on my parents and brother because they’re living this too. And thanks for those of you who have taken it upon yourself to follow IHMF updates and want to learn. I can’t wait to read this post next year and laugh at what I’m good at then, and see what I need to get back to. Always learning!!!


What I’ve gotten myself into this year:

  • 5 Chicago Trips
  • 50 days inpatient in Chicago
  • PICC line placement
  • Port-a-cath surgery
  • At least 20 IVs…probably way more
  • ER trips…uhh I can’t count that high.
  • 31 Infusion treatments
  • 5 ultrasounds
  • 2 MRIs
  • 4 CT scans
  • 2 MRA scans
  • 6 EKGs
  • Endoscopy
  • Botox
  • Diamond Headache Clinic
  • Mayo Clini- Rochester

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On one last note, if you are interested in purchasing a shirt, all funds raised from this shirt will go directly to Hemiplegic Migraine research and trials to be done in the United States.

Includes 3 styles with a black, grey, or white option for each.
Includes 3 styles with a black, grey, or white option for each.

Order Here!👇🏼

https://www.customink.com/g/hrr0-00aa-k9cq

Posted in Beating Hemiplegic Migraine, Hemiplegic Migraine, Just Keep Keepin On, Uncategorized

Frequent Flyer Miles

One of the hardest and most nerve racking decisions with HM is deciding when an ER trip is necessary. The emergency department is filled with trigger after trigger. Whether it be the fluorescent lighting, loud beeping nosies or odd smells(I have the nose of a blood hound when I’m bad off), it’s probably one of my least favorite places to be during a nasty attack. Or ever. However, when I look like I’m having a stroke and I go days without being able to hold down a single medication or ounce of fluid, it is sometimes necessary. Before we got the diagnosis of Hemiplegic Migraine, we visited the ER more often for my stoke like symptoms than we do now. Thank goodness. That being said, HM comes with some scary symptoms that are sometimes too much for us to handle at home.

When my jaw locks open we always go straight to my rescue meds, IM muscle relaxer shot and Ativan pill. If I’m able to get these both taken quickly enough, they sometimes knock my jaw back into place. Unfortunately, the two times this has worked for me, it has only lasted two hours max before my jaw becomes locked again. It is always such a hard choice when debating whether I should load myself full of rescues at home, and then probably still end up in the ER only to be loaded with more medications, or if we don’t wait long enough for my jaw to get worse and go quickly to the ER. We’ve taken both routes and honestly, it’s still a debate every time this symptom occurs. At this point, we have never been able to break one of these attacks on our own, but multiple rounds of IV medications get it under control.

A couple of weeks ago my face swelled so much that my blood was coagulating, making it look like someone beat the pulp out of me. I woke up that Friday morning with the right side of my face throbbing, but I couldn’t come up with a good explanation as to why. We chalked it up to an allergic reaction, to who knows what, and tried my 100mg Benadryl shot right away. When this didn’t affect the swelling at all, we iced and watched my face closely. I tried a second Benadryl shot and my prescription Benadryl pills. Nothing. By the next morning my right eye was swollen shut, leaving me with complete blindness in my right eye.  By that afternoon my left side of my face had started to swell and my left eye was in the beginning stages of swelling closed as well. The lady checking me out at the grocery store that day looked and me and said “Car accident?” I paused…but how the heck am I going to explain my crazy situation to her when I don’t even know what happened? Instead, I just said “Yeahhh, could’ve been worse.” She empathically told me she was glad I was okay. I walked away as fast as I could because we were about to lose it laughing. Sorry lady! I was finally convinced into an ER trip at 7 that night, even though the hospital can be a crazy place on Saturday nights. I got probably the best doctor I’ve ever had in the ER. Dr. Roberts actually read my whole chart, asked fantastic questions and ran several tests. We didn’t leave with many answers, but he offered admitting me and was willing and wanting to keep searching. After a long 9 hours I at least felt a little better. Ashley, Vanessa and I dragged ourselves out of of of the hospital at 3:30 in the morning. Yikes

1st picture- right when I woke up. (mom took the picture)
1st picture- right when I woke up. (mom took the picture)
2nd picture- a few hours later (still the right side, selfie angle)
2nd picture- a few hours later (still the right side, selfie angle)
3rd picture- about five days after first appearing.
3rd picture- about five days after first appearing.

There have been so many times that I wasn’t taken seriously in the ER. I’m labeled a “frequent flyer” thanks to the ridiculous amount of trips. I don’t think they understand I hate being there more than they hate seeing me there again. Usually, I’m either thought to be a drug seeker or they just want to fill me full of narcos and send me home. Neither is the right answer. I was once refused the meds I requested (Benadryl and Valium), given Fentanyl I had specifically asked not to get, written a script for a serious narcotic in which I refused, and instructions to “go home and sleep it off using the prescription”… all in the same trip.

Since I have begun presenting with more visible symptoms lately, and not coming there when the “Invisible illness” has taken me over, the staff seems to take me a bit more seriously. They can’t deny that something is wrong when my face is swelled up so much I can’t see my chest, or my jaw is stuck so badly I can’t speak. I guess that’s fine, as long as they help me when I really need it. It’s funny to watch the nurses faces change when they start to prep for an IV and I show them my portacath instead. You can literally see them start to take me more seriously, because I wouldn’t have a port if something wasn’t wrong, I guess.

hospital-slang-005

Probably the most annoying thing about ER trips is the ridiculous amount of judging that comes along with it. My parents hate going almost as much as I do. But, for the most part, they understand when I say it’s time to go. For example, this Friday was a really really bad day. An hour long seizure and my right arm getting numb and paralyzed was just the beginning. My jaw quickly became locked, which earned me nothing to eat, drink, or medications to take along with an agonizingly painful night in which I scored zero sleep. Before office hours were over Friday, my mom and I called my local doctor seeking help, knowing how bad this was going to end up. All we got from that attempt was a nasty remark from his nurse who then hung up on my mom. So, Saturday we made the choice it was time to go to the ER, as I couldn’t spend another day like that. With my blood pressure climbing the triage nurse said 167/102 earned me an immediate pass back to a room. I’ve been trying to tell this people it’s like a stroke!!! Luckily, my doctor and nurse were both understanding and fantastic. But ER trips involve so much down waiting time. We rushed the last round of meds, my dad and I worried we were going to miss something we just couldn’t miss. We pulled out of that parking lot at 1:50, made it home to change into dress clothes and pulled into the location smoothly at 2:41. Score one for the home team.

Shaky and exhausted I’ve never been so glad to be rushed, or even more glad to make it to a destination in time. It was such a battle trying to decide if we were going to the ER this weekend but it paid off more than ever. A full day to say the least Saturday, including a long night. I loved feeling well enough to end the night snuggled up with Courtney. I don’t get enough nights of girl talk with her.  I participated, with much energy, in family pictures and my Grandpa’s birthday lunch. I even drove to pick Kelsey up! Thank goodness for the good meds and steroids. It is times like this trip that make all the judging, waiting, debating, and hard decisions worth the trip.

IMG_5567       IMG_3171      IMG_3227 IMG_5619

~Had

Posted in Beating Hemiplegic Migraine, Hemiplegic Migraine, Today I Win, Uncategorized

October 9th. One Year.

One year ago today, October 9th I was diagnosed with Sporadic Hemiplegic Migraine(SHM). SHM is one of two types of a rare neurological disease, caused by a gene mutation. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine(FHM) and Sporadic Hemiplegic Migraine affect only 3% of our population, world-wide. Sufferers of both SHM and FHM present with stroke-like symptoms, visual disturbances, memory loss and more. Severe attacks may leave people with prolonged hemiplegia and seizures, these are the attacks I suffer from most. 

Want to learn more? Check these out!👇🏼
https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/gard/10768/hemiplegic-migraine/resources/1
http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/sporadic-hemiplegic-migraine

In the last year I have found peace with having fought two years for a diagnosis. I’ve been grateful to have found the HM community to lean on and learn from. We’ve found comfort in Hemiplegic Migraines, in the most odd and unfortunate way. We sure have learned a lot this year! 

This is a post I shared on my original blog, the one I kept a secret😉, the day I got to go home after those initial 15 days in the hospital.

After being poked and prodded, scanned, tested and asked uncomfortable questions, 8 rounds of blood tests, two IV, one IV infection, one IV knocked into a nerve, 11 shots in my butt and one everyday in my stomach, my first “surgical procedure” getting my PICC line, my second procedure getting my endoscopy, 3 ultrasounds, a couple of hours worth of scans, getting woken up 5 times a night orrrr not sleeping at all, getting infusions around the clock, having good days and bad, and staying in the hospital 14 nights…….I’m happy to say how worth it all of that was. As my “anniversary” rolls around again, soon, it’s nice to at least feel knowledgeable and not so shocked or in denial. It’s chronic, so it’s something I’m stuck with. In typical Hadley fashion, it’s amongst the most rare so it doesn’t come with a treatment locked and loaded. We’re happy to be doing what we can and letting my body breathe a little after so many heavy drugs is best for now.”

 
I’d say some things have changed in the last 365 days.
  1. Two IV’s is for wimps💁🏼
  2. Talking about getting shots in your butt doesn’t ever stop getting awkward. No matter how you put it. No matter how many times.                                                                                                                                                                                         🙋🏼My dad gives me shots in my butt.                                                                                                                                             🙈See. Still awkward.

3) PICC lines and edocscopys are hardly surgical procedures. 

4) I hope my writings I share aren’t so whiny!!

5)….I was serious about heavy drugs. I don’t remember writing this and couldn’t tell you these details otherwise. Seriously.😂

Willis Tower in Chicago!

 

Visiting “the bean”…what I wanted to see most but have no memory of. Lol

    

 Fun night in the city with my momma the night before 🙂

Hard Rock Cafe!!

  

 

On one last note, if you are interested in purchasing a shirt, all funds raised from this shirt will go directly to Hemiplegic Migraine research and trials to be done in the United States.

Includes 3 styles with a black, grey, or white option for each.
Includes 3 styles with a black, grey, or white option for each.

Order Here!

https://www.customink.com/g/hrr0-00aa-k9cq

Posted in Beating Hemiplegic Migraine, Chronic Migraine, Daily Migraine, Health Blog, Hemiplegic Migraine, Seizures, Today I Win, Uncategorized

Mom and Hadley take Chicago!

We survived getting to the big city all by ourselves! My dad sent us off with farewell grunts as he lifted our suite cases out of the car. For the record, mine weighed three pounds less than my mom’s so she carries big bags too(Casey and Sally😉)!Of course our plane was delayed an hour after we went through security and then another hour and a half once we got on the plane. Frustrating!! We were a little worried how me and flying would mix, but I only put on one small show for the crowd. Once we landed and got our luggage Mom was too scared to flag a taxi so we hopped on a shuttle. What was supposed to be a hours ride to the hotel in downtown Chicago took us two and a half hours. If you know my mom….everyone must’ve been running on her time clock that day. 😉 As we battled the front desk with messed up reservations my mom discovered she’d left the folder with all of my forms for the doctor visit on the plane. We finally got everything straightened out and headed up to our room….on the 13th floor of course. We don’t travel in any other style! 


Through the waiting in tight spaces on the plane, to standing forever and again being in tight spaces with a crying baby during our shuttle adventure, and then through the mix ups, my body gave it it’s best shot. I hung in there…at some points I don’t know how. Easily fatigued Hadley plus a day full of travel aren’t exactly meant to be. But we managed. We missed all meals during the day so decided to walk down the block for my first run in with Chicago deep dish style pizza! I gagged the first bite in and settled for garlic bread and veggies instead. We walked the blocks of downtown Chicago where I learned many things!-
1- this girl’s too anxious for big city livin 
2- don’t mark your spot with a Starbucks…there is literally one on every corner
3- the city stinks. Bad.
4- Chicago goes out of their way for the “typical white girl”….everything in Trader Joes is pumpkin spice flavored 

5- Chicago runs on Pepsi products no Dr.Pepper is not okay.



Patience is ones greatest virtue

~Had